Changes to San Francisco Airspace

Neil Kidd, Chief Technology Officer Altitude Angel

There are some substantial changes to the airspace around San Francisco.

Most of these changes are to airspace above 400’, but the most significant change for drone operators is that the Class B volume around SFO changed shape. This is particularly important as Class B affects both Part 107 and recreational (Part 101) drone pilots. The good news is that the volume actually got smaller, but as most of the reduction sits over the Golden Gate National Recreation Area National Park, you might not actually be able to make use of the 300 billion cubic feet that just got handed back to you!

Check out https://dronesafetymap.com/#loc=37.6403377,-122.3438749,12 for the full, up-to-date picture.

Forty Eight hours as a drone data analyst in a major wildfire in California

The Carr fire is my second trip to a disaster zone of California as a data analyst supporting public agency UAV teams. Groups from Alameda and Contra Costa County Sheriffs office, along with Menlo Fire Department and San Francisco police arrived in Redding after the fire had burned ~ 1000 homes with half a dozen lives lost and continued to spread more broadly in Shasta county. Residents had yet to return to their evacuated neighborhoods and, understandably, there was a lot of anxiety for information on what remained. Our goal was to provide information quickly.

Teams assembled the first morning at Redding City. Coffee was poured and the Air Boss for Cal Fire briefed the teams about capping altitudes at 100-200 ft, depending on location within the Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) because of manned aircraft in the area. Redding police then identified the neighborhoods where imagery capture would be most valuable.

My role was to coordinate the data capture and end deliverables to the GIS teams of Redding and Shasta County. Essentially, I was a link between the eyes in the sky and the public agencies responsible for rebuilding the community.

After the briefing came rapid on-boading. There were different drones, different apps and different end products. These all needed streamlined into a workflow. The drones were all off-the-shelf DJI drones, primarily Phantom 4s and Mavic Pros. Apps needed accounts created, logins and passwords. If some weren’t as familiar with features of different apps, a quick tutorial was provided and my cell number in case there were glitches. There are no real standards yet across the drone industry for emergency drone analytics, so I’m really just triaging as I go.

And then we dispersed. Splitting into teams to cross the city to preset neighborhoods.

From my view in the back of an law enforcement SUV, I found the devastation of the Carr fire was not a concentrated as the Tubbs fire in Santa Rosa nine months before. In that fire, 3000 homes were incinerated in a single night and it resembled a war zone. This fire was much more patchy with smaller sections of any one neighborhood burned. Yet, it was the sheer scale that left an impression. The fire zone is enormous, covering well over a hundred square miles (and still burning today).

Obviously, it is incredibly sad to see the destruction of homes. There were pets and people lost, including two small children in the areas we were working about the age of my own daughter. These are the things that stick to the soul long after one is back home doing mundane things.

The teams performed amazingly. We captured over one hundred 360 panoramas across the majority of target areas. I found 360s are a simple, but powerful visualization from the Tubb’s fire. I decided to use them again and it end up working well to cover a large area quickly. Teams also carried out standard mapping missions with overlapping photos, being capped at such low altitudes greatly restricted this type of mapping to crucial areas.

Then came the tsunami of data as teams poured in hot and tired from the field. SD cards needed sorted, flight logs pulled off tablets, password remember and software updated. This is all before you have even started processing. With the help of a lot of coffee Red Bull though, the data started coming together. 360 degree pin points of high-resolution imagery of began populating a central map. Thing were working.

Processing continued overnight and through the next day as teams continued to collect more imagery. I funneled the end products into formats that the city and county could use and interpret. This typically involves ESRI products and ArcGIS, a standard for most public GIS teams. A was a major lesson I learned from the previous fire was to make sure to think about where the data was going to end up before collection started

After two days, the city was able to push the data out to the public and a clear victory was won for the drone industry. The technology was validated for an emergency, despite the sensitivity of UAVs in fire areas in California. We drove home to the Bay Area exhausted and smelling of smoke. Every SD card was full, every battery was drained.

If this sounds smooth…it wasn’t. There were lots of hiccups along the way. Tablets overheated in the high temperatures. Apps didn’t work. The internet was slow. Drones were grounded because of software issues in the TFR. There were rouge drones from who knows where. Missions were paused for helicopters. We ran out of coffee.

Still, we got it done and learned a lot of lessons along the way. I’ll share this one and leave the others for another time.

The drone is only half the story in these emergencies. The other is the data. There is a clear need for more drone data analysts. These are not necessarily pilots, but individuals who work with the UAV teams to ensure the data is flowing correctly and connect these teams in the right way to the appropriate public agencies, from city to state to federal. No data analysts and the hard work by pilots will eventually just sit on a hard drive somewhere in a drawer. The other lessons I’ll leave for another time.

I am honored to have volunteered my time with these teams and to do my own small part in assisting those impacted by the fire. My hope is the imagery is helpful to the residents and to the broader public in understanding the scope of these tragedies.

https://www.scholarfarms.com

Valkyrie Systems Aerospace Announces Partnership with the State of Oklahoma

VSA working to create high-tech jobs and partnerships with area universities

Valkyrie Systems Aerospace (VSA), a cutting-edge developer of manned/unmanned aerial platforms, is proud to announce an exciting partnership with the State of Oklahoma. This partnership will ultimately accommodate manufacturing facilities, as well as flight operations and training in the greater Oklahoma City area.
https://youtu.be/ur3i4G-ezC0
VSA was recently awarded a 21st Century Quality Jobs Program incentive contract that will create at least 352 new high paying jobs for the State of Oklahoma within the next five years. “We appreciate the efforts of Governor Mary Fallin and her team. They have worked hard to create an environment to attract some of the most exciting companies in the aerospace industry today. Oklahoma already has some of the top aviation companies in the world, and they are starting to grow the unmanned arena as well. The State of Oklahoma is well on its way to become the leader in unmanned aerospace development and manufacturing,” said Glenn Dawson, CEO Valkyrie Systems Aerospace. “We are proud to announce our choice of Oklahoma City for VSA’s operations center set to open 4th quarter 2018.
“Oklahoma is one of the world’s premier destinations for the aerospace and defense industry. The new Valkyrie facility will continue to elevate this industry in our state,” said Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin. “By bringing aircraft manufacturing to Oklahoma, the company will help us grow as a leader in aerospace and UAS. Our talented workforce and low cost of doing business along with a good quality of life makes Oklahoma very attractive for growing companies like Valkyrie. This is another example that our economic pro-business policies are diversifying Oklahoma’s economy.”

“One of the reasons VSA chose to partner with the State of Oklahoma was the ability to integrate our company with the University of Oklahoma’s aviation and aerospace engineering program, as well as Oklahoma State University’s autonomous UAV program. We are proud to bring high tech jobs to the greater Oklahoma City area. Valkyrie’s goal is to create and maintain partnerships with the higher education system in Oklahoma, all the while developing and retaining students with the goal of moving them into the aerospace workforce as supported by Valkyrie Systems Aerospace,” said Steve Tafoya, Managing Partner of VSA.

“The Oklahoma Department of Commerce has worked with Valkyrie for nine months to bring this project to fruition,” said Deby Snodgrass, Oklahoma Secretary of Commerce and Tourism. “By locating in Oklahoma City, they will be in close proximity to other world-class companies and defense operations and near our research universities which will provide a pipeline of talent through numerous aerospace and UAS degree programs.”

VSA’s HoverJets are unmanned and optionally piloted aircraft which support multiple global missions that include: medical evacuation, extraction of personnel and equipment, real-time situational awareness and threat detection, re-establishment of downed communications systems, firefighting and much more.

The HoverJets’ unique heavy lift vertical takeoff and landing allow it to operate in any environment whether it be land, sea or air.

Valkyrie Systems Aerospace, the Guardian and the Eagle, are products of over 25 years of engineering, testing and refinement, comprising seven generations of technological advancement

Valkyrie Systems Aerospace – So That All May Live

For more information:

VALKYRIE SYSTEMS AEROSPACE –[email protected]valkyrieuav.com

Prominent international drone experts at the FAI International Drones Conference and Expo 2018

FAI, the World Air Sports Federation, announces the full list of expert speakers attending the FAI International Drones Conference and Expo 2018 at the EPFL Rolex Learning Centre in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Global experts from throughout the drone world will gather to share their expertise at the two-day conference taking place on 31 August and 1 September. The full list including biographies can be consulted on the website www.fai.org/drones-conference-speakers.

Attending the event will be representatives from the drones industry and related science community, governmental authorities and regulators, air sports organisations and media who will hear presentations in Safety, Innovation and Drone Sport.

Speakers include:

Simon Johnson, Drone Industry Association Switzerland: Simon Johnson mentors and invests in Swiss tech start-ups and is an advisor to the Swiss National Centre for Robotics. Opening the conference, he will present the topic of ‘Current Opportunities and Challenges of the Drones Industry’.

André Borschberg, H55: André Borschberg completed the first-ever circumnavigation of the globe in a solar airplane without a drop of fuel and is paving the way for the evolution of aviation technology. He will discuss ‘Why Drones can play an important role in Aviation’

Grantley Reed, Freespace Drone Racing: With over 19 years of aviation experience, Grantley Reed represents FDR, who design world leading giant racing drones. His presentation will cover the innovation of the user experience: ‘Fans first: the FS500 large racing drones’

Tim Hosenfeldt, Schaeffler Group, co-founder of the Formula E, opens the DRONEMASTERS Meetup

Benoît Curdy, Global UTM Association: GUTMA represents over 60 companies with the purpose of fostering the safe, secure and efficient integration of drones in national airspace systems. As Secretary General, Benoît Curdy will discuss the ‘Revolution of classic air space management: how drones lead to live visibility of air sports and commercial air transport alike’

Max Hjalmarsson, Volocopter, presents ‘Taxi Drones: Volocopter’

Julien Rebetez, Picterra: An R&D engineer who has worked on a number of remote sensing data analysis projects, Julien Rebetez works with Picterra on software architecture and machine learning. His talk will present the topic of ‘Artificial intelligence and Earth observation imagery from drones and satellite’

FAI President, Fits Brink commented: “The second edition of the FAI International Drones Conference and Expo has an all-star line-up of renowned experts coming together to share their knowledge. This collaborative environment will advance the technology, safety and user potential of drones and we’re excited to discover the directions drones will take in the future as a result of this conference.”

The conference and expo form a central part of the EPFL Drone Days from 31 August to 2 September 2018, including the EPFL Robotics Showcase and the Drone Innovators Session, and finishing with the EPFL Drone Race Cup. The EPFL (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) is a renowned engineering college, research institute and centre for excellence in robotics research.

LeClairRyan Attorneys: Routine Drone Flights Could Become ‘Aerial Trespass’ Under Proposed Law

Influential commission mulls state-level measure that could prove problematic for burgeoning U.S. drone industry.

Many of today’s routine drone flights could be redefined as “aerial trespass” under a law proposed by a commission known for its influence with state legislatures, cautioned veteran LeClairRyan aviation attorneys during a webinar attended by more than 300 aviation and other professionals.

“Across the country, everyone involved in Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) should closely track the trajectory of the so-called UAS Uniform Tort Law, which was discussed for the first time this past July by the Uniform Law Commission,” noted Mark A. Dombroff, an Alexandria-based member of LeClairRyan and co-leader of the national law firm’s Aviation Industry practice. “If adopted by states, at least in its present form, it could create conflicts and challenges for the fast-growing UAS sector.”

Dombroff and his colleague Mark E. McKinnon, a partner in LeClairRyan’s Alexandria office and head of the firm’s UAS practice area team, discussed the measure during an August 8 webinar on the topic of drone waivers, exemptions and certifications under federal law.

The Uniform Law Commission (ULC), which provides draft legislation for independent adoption by state lawmakers, rang alarm bells among many in the UAS sector when it discussed the so-called Uniform Tort Law last month at its annual meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, McKinnon noted. “The idea for the ULC is to help states get together and pass laws harmonize with each other,” he explained. “Right now, in most states, trespassing onto another person’s land carries a presumption of injury and a right to sue. This measure aims to do something similar for aerial trespass involving UAS, with potentially broad implications. The view is that existing law doesn’t provide enough protection for landowners.”

Across the country, McKinnon continued, aerial trespass is typically akin to nuisance law and requires proof of actual injury. The proposal would make all encroachment over another person’s land by UAS a form of trespass that conveys a presumption of damages, so long as the altitude of the flight was 200 feet or below. As Dombroff told the audience, that could put state laws on a collision course with existing FAA jurisdiction and regulations (under which drones are permitted to fly up to 400 feet in altitude). “It sure seems to me that if that this were enacted in a state, the federal government would quickly file a lawsuit arguing that it was an unlawful preemption of FAA authority,” he said.

The measure continues to be under discussion by the ULC, which plans to debate it further next year, McKinnon said. “We could see some action on this moving forward,” he said. “In general, this is an area where states will likely be focused over the next couple of years. Some lawmakers want to tease out the boundaries of their citizens’ rights to the air above their properties. The question is how that will interact with federalized airspace.”

As a trusted advisor, LeClairRyan provides business counsel and client representation in corporate law and litigation. In this role, the firm applies its knowledge, insight and skill to help clients achieve their business objectives while managing and minimizing their legal risks, difficulties and expenses. With offices from coast to coast, the firm represents a wide variety of clients nationwide. For more information about LeClairRyan, visit www.leclairryan.com.

Lifeguard Drone

As part of the Lifeguard team and now ever present on the beach in the port of Sagunto, Spain, the Auxdron Lifeguard Drone was ready and waiting as one of the Lifeguards sounded the alarm that there were people caught in an undertow and looked like they needed help.

This event happened on Wednesday the 15th of August on a beach known to have strong undertows under certain conditions. The Lifeguard team are well aware of the danger and are trained for these specific situations. One of the most important parts of such a rescue is the response time to the victims. Adrian Plazas and Enrique Fernandez were two Lifeguards who knew this more than most. Together they started a company to design and build a Drone that was capable of saving lives. Three years later their vision was realised when the drone, they developed, saved the life of a woman caught in an undertow that could have cost her life.

Early afternoon on that Wednesday a group of swimmers about 70m from shore realised that they were in an undertow, rapidly being swept out to sea and were unable to return. They managed to signal the Lifeguard in the watchtower and the alarm was sounded. On hearing the alarm the pilot of the Auxdron deployed the drone to the scene.

Communicating with the lifeguard in the tower via radio, the pilot was able to find the distressed swimmers and assess the situation. The pilot Diego Torres told us “Once I heard the alarm I was off, I had a general location but with the help of the lifeguard giving me instructions and the video feed from the drone, we were on top of then within the minute”

The Auxdron has three main functions within a rescue situation. The first is to locate the victims and assess the situation in the least amount of time possible. The drone has the capability, if needed, to deploy two flotation devices that inflate on contact with the water and can be immediately used by the potential victim. Its second function is to clearly identify where the victim is located. By hovering near the victim, the now in transit lifeguards can move towards the location of the drone, knowing that the victim will be nearby. The third function is as a provider of information to the incoming lifeguards as well as the medical team and local police who all have their distinct roles within a rescue. They are all on the same channel and have the same information. The drone can communicate information such as; the number of victims, there perceived condition and their most likely exit point.

As the Drone approached the group the pilot could clearly see that they were in distress. In particular, a lady who was being helped by the other members of the group. The pilot decided to deploy the flotation device. The life vest inflated on contact with the water and because the life vest is attached to the drone, the pilot was able to manoeuvre the life vest directly to the victim. On taking the Life vest, it disconnected from the drone and the victim was able to place it over her head. It was plain to see that she was in a much calmer state once the life vest was placed, she clearly was relieved to know that help was on its way. Moments later two lifeguard on a jet ski was on location and the lady was taken back to shore where the police had already made some space on the beach and medical staff were en route.

The drones work however was not yet done. The pilot remained with the other swimmers in the group who were still in the undertow current and continued to relay information about their condition unit all were safe.

The drone is now an integral part of the Lifeguarding team. This rescue was only possible thanks to the Lifeguard team and the hours of training needed to work together so symbiotically.

Auxdron Lifeguard Drone rescues swimmers from Spanish beach

As part of the Lifeguard team and now ever present on the beach in the port of Sagunto, Spain, the Auxdron Lifeguard Drone was ready and waiting as one of the Lifeguards sounded the alarm that there were people caught in an undertow and looked like they needed help.

This event happened on Wednesday the 15th of August on a beach known to have strong undertows under certain conditions. The Lifeguard team are well aware of the danger and are trained for these specific situations. One of the most important parts of such a rescue is the response time to the victims. Adrian Plazas and Enrique Fernandez were two Lifeguards who knew this more than most. Together they started a company to design and build a Drone that was capable of saving lives. Three years later their vision was realised when the drone, they developed, saved the life of a woman caught in an undertow that could have cost her life.

Early afternoon on that Wednesday a group of swimmers about 70m from shore realised that they were in an undertow, rapidly being swept out to sea and were unable to return. They managed to signal the Lifeguard in the watchtower and the alarm was sounded. On hearing the alarm the pilot of the Auxdron deployed the drone to the scene.

Communicating with the lifeguard in the tower via radio, the pilot was able to find the distressed swimmers and assess the situation. The pilot Diego Torres told us “Once I heard the alarm I was off, I had a general location but with the help of the lifeguard giving me instructions and the video feed from the drone, we were on top of then within the minute”

The Auxdron has three main functions within a rescue situation. The first is to locate the victims and assess the situation in the least amount of time possible. The drone has the capability, if needed, to deploy two flotation devices that inflate on contact with the water and can be immediately used by the potential victim. Its second function is to clearly identify where the victim is located. By hovering near the victim, the now in transit lifeguards can move towards the location of the drone, knowing that the victim will be nearby. The third function is as a provider of information to the incoming lifeguards as well as the medical team and local police who all have their distinct roles within a rescue. They are all on the same channel and have the same information. The drone can communicate information such as; the number of victims, there perceived condition and their most likely exit point.

As the Drone approached the group the pilot could clearly see that they were in distress. In particular, a lady who was being helped by the other members of the group. The pilot decided to deploy the flotation device. The life vest inflated on contact with the water and because the life vest is attached to the drone, the pilot was able to manoeuvre the life vest directly to the victim. On taking the Life vest, it disconnected from the drone and the victim was able to place it over her head. It was plain to see that she was in a much calmer state once the life vest was placed, she clearly was relieved to know that help was on its way. Moments later two lifeguard on a jet ski was on location and the lady was taken back to shore where the police had already made some space on the beach and medical staff were en route.

The drones work however was not yet done. The pilot remained with the other swimmers in the group who were still in the undertow current and continued to relay information about their condition unit all were safe.

The drone is now an integral part of the Lifeguarding team. This rescue was only possible thanks to the Lifeguard team and the hours of training needed to work together so symbiotically. So although this article is about a Drone I would like to show my appreciation to all who risk their lives to save people like us.

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The Current State of CUAS in the US: Prisons – Cigarettes are not Guns Part 3 of 7

The prison industry’s operations are not a widely known to the general public, for starters most assume the state or federal government runs the prison, this is true that there are both federal and state-owned prison facilities, but there are also private facilities that outnumber those ran by the government. Private facilities are run by civilians, are for-profit and are protected by prison guards who are hired to watch over inmates providing security.

Some research and reports indicate that most of the contraband is brought in by prison guards which makes for a corrupt system, however, a prison guard who might bring drugs to an inmate would never bring a gun to an inmate. Now we queue the nefarious drone operator who would deliver a gun for money because they have nothing to lose only money to gain.

A guard, on the other hand, might lose their life if an inmate got the gun and fired it at them or a co-worker/friend so they would never bring a gun in for their own safety. This changes the security dynamics when someone outside the system can deliver a deadly weapon to someone on the inside.

This is a whole new level of liability for prison owners and for the families of those who could be killed by another inmate with a gun. On TV shows about prisons and movies, we hear about the dangers of homemade weapons such as shanks made from metal and plastic, but a gun is a new level of scary especially when no guard would be expecting an inmate to have a gun. Contraband is also another problem, but this seems far less likely to be as threatening as a gun. Cigarettes, cell phones, money, porn and drugs are the top contraband items that can be delivered to inmates waiting on the inside to be dropped off in the yard and recovered.

Cell phones to a prisoner can be just as dangerous as bringing a gun to a prison, but to someone on the outside. Inmates call others to commit crimes on their behalf from behind bars setting up the event and receiving messages on contraband cell phones. The protection of the people who are testifying against a prisoner is at stake when the prisoned can find out who they are, where they live, evidence in the media and happens unaware to people who are barred from the outside world.

Inmates have nothing but time to sit around and think of innovative ways to use drones to

deliver the goods on the inside, it won’t be much longer and they will have thought of new ways to use drones for illegal purposes. Some prisons also are uniquely set up to be great test areas for the use of CUAS equipment while we learn by trial and error the effectiveness of CUAS equipment in a civilian setting. Most prisons are located in an area with not much going on around it as not many people do want to live close to a prison so they build them in remote locations also to make escape harder and the perimeter and surrounding area easier to watch.

They have cleared land and obstacles to might restrict the view the guards have from the tops of the wall and towers making an ideal setting to monitor the effectiveness of the equipment meaning how well did the equipment work, was the vehicle brought down safely and what did we learn from the interdiction?

Article on complex drone smuggling operation in the UK, watch the video on the innovative

retrieval system. The authorities knew they were conducting operations and were able to

strategically place cameras to catch the gang. Some states also want to jam cell phones within prisons, read the article here.

Prison makes a great testing area for CUAS because most of their locations are far from

anything else, now there are exceptions. But modern prisons are built away from civilization and have miles of perimeter that protect the buildings and allows them to see anyone coming from miles away. Now we enter a new threat correction officers will need to be trained to be protected from the air and the technology changes many aspects of protection, to start prison walls aren’t effective to an airborne vehicle and they are a primary defense to a prison.

The rates for drone sightings around US prisons are astronomical. From 10 reports a month to 10,000, a month have grown in size and complexity. If anyone needs CUAS it is prisons and especially the facilities that are located in the out of town locations, then they should be one of the first to test out the systems. Through testing and real world research, any failures with equipment and the drone can fall on the ground without concerning many on harming anyone or the surrounding infrastructure.

Prisons could become part of the work force who first tests out CUAS equipment through pilot programs, licensing, training and security updating.

Another big aspect of CUAS for prisons is gaining the intel off the drone through cyber forensics to find the bad guy, owner and pilot. If the drone has been destroyed from a kinetic mitigation technique, then it will be useless to attempt to retrieve intelligence from the drone as numbers can be scratched off. I’m not going to go into the details here on the juicy stuff.

Prisons should join the CUAS Coalition as a group and we can specifically lobby and write regulations to be beneficial for the testing and use of CUAS equipment at prisons. Let us also remember that cigarettes are not guns.

If you are a state or federal corrections department and would like more help in the areas of legality, changing the law, training or equipment consulting please contact us and become a member.

Rob Thompson

Co-Founder | CUAS Coalition www.cuascoalition.org

SME for U.S. Department of Homeland Security – CIPAC UAS Security Working Group

Chairman at Countering UAS Summit Washington DC https://counteruas.iqpc.com/

Website: www.cuascoalition.org/contact

Email: [email protected]

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robthompsonpilot/

sUAS News: https://www.suasnews.com/author/rob-thompson

Yuneec Presents the Mantis Q With Voice Control

yuneec mantis q with voice control

Yuneec International is the current world leader in regard to electric aviation. This week, they’ve presented the Mantis Q, the latest, all-new extension of the award-winning Yuneec lineup.

The Mantis Q, which was pitched to be a travel drone, features foldable arms, gesture and facial detection controls, a maximum flight time of up to 33 minutes, a 4K camera, and a portable, mini controller. As well as the facial and gesture features, you can use voice commands.

The Mantis Q recognizes a wide variety of voice commands, including “take off”, “wake up”, “take a picture”, “record video”, “return to home”, and “take a selfie”. Thanks to facial recognition and gesture mode, the Mantis Q will take a picture of you if it spots you smiling or waving at a distance from up to 13 feet, or 4 meters, away from it.

yuneec mantis q 1

Aside from the standard thumbstick control with a small controller arm, there’s an additional arm that is designed to hold your smartphone.

Basic Journey mode, Orbit Me, and Point of Interest are just a few of the other features that the Mantis Q has to offer. It doesn’t come with any Obstacle Avoidance function whatsoever, but it makes up for it with infra-red pointed downward and dual sonar sensors to ensure you can fly safely indoors.

The portability of the Mantis Q is exceptional, weighing less than a pound, 6.6 x 3.8 x 2.2 inches in size, and even has propellers that fold all on their own! You can hit speeds of up 44 mph, or 70 km/h, when you enable Sport mode.

yuneec mantis q elements

As we previously mentioned, it has a 4K camera with electronically-stabilized 1080p resolution. You can take 13 MP photos in both DNG and JPG formats, as well. The camera is capable of tilting to a 90-degree angle if you want it to look straight down or tilt upward as much as 20 degrees.

“The Mantis Q was developed in order to offer the most cutting-edge, advanced drone features, including facial detection and voice control, in a package that’s ultra portable and easy to use. Consumers will find that the Mantis Q integrates seamlessly into everyday experiences. They will appreciate the incredible energy efficient package, which allows for up to 33 minutes of flight time, to help in capturing every moment,” commented the CEO of Yuneec International, Michael Jiang.

The Mantis Q is as a portable, efficient, travel-sized drone that performs like a legit agility racer. You can enable a live image feed with a latency of less than 200 ms on your smartphone when it has a stable connection to the remote control.

You can pre-order the Mantis Q right now for $499.99, which will give you the Mantis Q drone, the tiny controller, spare propellers, a three-port charger, 1 battery, and a USB and power cable.

If you can swing it, you can pre-order the Mantis Q X-Pack for $649.99. This choice will give you the Mantis Q drone, the controller, 3 batteries, spare propellers, a three-port charger, a USB and power cable, and a travel shoulder bag.