Morphing Drones Able To Change Shape To Fit Through Gaps

Morphing Drones Able To Change Shape To Fit Through Gaps

Drones have always had a place in the world of search and rescue. Being able to get a birds eye view quickly and survey large areas of land is invaluable when every minute counts. While they’ve always been great in the sky, recent advancements have them also getting low and into tight spaces. Enter the morphing drones; drones that are automatically able to change their shape and fit through tight spaces.

There’s been several different teams all around the world that are working on these exact type of drones. Many different designs have been thought up, each one with its own pros and cons.

The team at UC Berkeley has just created one such drone, which they dubbed the “Passively Morphing Quadcopter”. What’s really interesting about this particular drone is its ability to change shape without the need for additional powered hardware. This is a big deal as it means the drones battery life is significantly improved. In a life or death situation you don’t want to waste precious minutes because you’re drone’s battery is dead.

drone shrinks midflight to fit through gaps

The way it works is by using springs which are always under tension.These springs are attached to each arm of the drone, at the end of which is a motor. When the motors are on they are able to overcome the tension, but when turned off snap back flush with the drone. The drone is able to measure a trajectory, and then shut its motors off at just the right time in order to clear the obstacle. Watching this happen is very exciting, and it’s quite an accomplishment when you stop to think about the work that goes into actually measuring the drones path through an object.

The downside with this drone though is that once the motors are off the only thing propelling the drone is its momentum. Once that runs out, then the drone needs to grow back to its flying size with the motors on, or risk crashing.

A team at the University of Zurich also created their own “morphing quadcopter”. This one uses small motors connected to each of the drone’s arms that move it into different shapes. This uses more battery power, but allows for a great range of motion and sustained transformation. It too is able to use cameras on the drone in order to determine the size of a gap, and then adjust its wings accordingly.

This drone also comes with the ability to inspect the integrity of structures and carry small objects. Both of these features are big wins in a rescue situation, and can be used to help rescuers know if an area is safe, or bring water to those who are trapped.

Another team at France’s Étienne Jules Marey Institute of Movement Sciences has also created their own version of the morphing drone. Using a series of flexible wires, it’s able to adjust its wings in order to move through gaps. In its testing room, it uses a series of cameras that track the drone and help it determine where obstacles are. However, it too is equipped with a high-speed camera that will allow it to judge for itself where obstacles are, and how to adjust to fit through them.

These are just some examples of the exciting work that’s being done in the realm of morphing drones. There’s a lot of interesting work being done, and it’s very exciting to see all the different techniques researchers are using to build the drones.

This is all fantastic news as these types of drones will greatly increase the effectiveness of search and rescue teams. Imagine a drone being able to fly into rubble to find out exactly where survivors are. This type of information could save hours and help focus teams on exactly where they need to be looking. This would be a huge win for search and rescue teams, and promises to be a very impactful use for this new technology.

It’s also important to keep in mind all the additional things these types of drones can do. As mentioned above, one of the drones has the ability to carry small objects while still morphing itself down to fit into small spaces. Imagine that drone carrying water and food to trapped survirors while teams work to get them out. It’s those types of things that can make a huge difference. Who knows what types of other fantastic ideas researchers will come up with in years to come.

If all that doesn’t get you excited, these things are also crazy cool to watch and fly, that’s gotta count for something!

Dronethusiast Team. Kennedy Martinez

KennedyMartinez

kennedy@dronethusiast.com

Kennedy Martinez is a resident writer who joined Dronethusiast at the beginning of 2019. She has years of experience reviewing drones and other tech products. When it comes to flying drones, Kennedy loves the ability to create artistic videos from a unique point of view. Kennedy enjoys researching new drones and other exciting products that are available to consumers which is why she is committed to creating the best buyer’s guides for our readers.

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Gains In Thermophotovoltaic Efficiency set To Power Drones For Days

Drones Could Fly for Days with Photovoltaic Engine

Researchers at UC Berkeley just made a huge improvement in Thermophotovoltaic Efficiency which could lead to an increase in drone battery life. Using these new techniques, super light engines with the ability to generate enough energy to power drones for days could be right around the corner. There’s still a lot of work to be done, but the results are very exciting and promising.

If you’re a fan of drones then this is big news for you. There’s a lot of science behind it, but the important facts are that it could lead to a significant improvement in drone flight times.

The breakthrough comes in the science of thermovoltaics, the process of turning heat into electrical energy. This process has until recently been capped at a modest 23 percent efficient, but the breakthrough discovery has hit a never before seen 29%. Researchers involved in the project are now setting their sights on pushing that efficiency as high as a whopping 50! This all translates into a longer battery life for your drone.

The science behind the discovery comes from the ability to “re-use” low energy photons. Normally, these low energy photons are not able to produce any electricity and are lost. The teams biggest challenge has been how to use these low energy photons, which in turn would lead to large gains in efficiency.

The crux of the discovery is using a mirror to reflect these photons. By attaching a reflective mirror on the back of the photovoltaic cell, they were able to reflect these photons back to the thermal source, giving it a second chance to produce electricity. This leads to a higher efficiency, and ultimately more power.

thermophotovoltaic efficiency power drones

This discovery has allowed them to break the previous barriers of efficiency. Researchers are further pushing this by increasing the reflectivity of the material. This simple change is estimated to jump the efficiency to 36% according Luis M.Pazos Outon, a postdoctoral researcher in EEC and one of the lead authors on the paper. If done, this would smash the previous record, and pave the way for further research.

This technological breakthrough has huge implications and potential for a large range of uses. Thermophotovoltaics are ultra-light, and with increased efficiency will provide more power at less weight than traditional batteries. This bodes well for things like drones or unmanned craft, which want to reduce weight as much as possible. Thermophotovolatics act as an ultra-light, ultra-efficient battery that could turn into the ability to fly drones for days. They would also be significantly lighter than traditional drone batteries, another big win for drone enthusiasts.

The uses don’t stop there though. Things like space probes are another great candidate. Having an ultra-efficient power source onboard could mean deep space craft could be powered for centuries, and allow humanity to reach far outside of our solar system.

As efficiency increases there’s also the potential to even power large items like houses. A thermophotovoltaic generator could power a house, and be less than a few inches across. The possibilities are enormous, and the future is very exciting for the field.

The researchers are back at it, and looking to push the envelope even more. Their next goal is to hit 50%, blowing past their 29%. Only time will tell if they will succeed, but regardless, their accomplishments are already quite impressive. Drone enthusiasts should watch these developments closely as it will directly affect them.

It’s also important to note that these results are actually a continuation from a 2011 paper out of the same lab. This is particularly interesting as it shows this research team has been working on, and delivering results on this topic for a while now. Hopefully, their success will continue far into the future.

Zunaid Omair, a graduate student researcher in EECS and first author on the paper, comments “Just by increasing the reflectivity, we will get 36 percent efficiency. But by making other tweaks to the cell, using proven techniques in the scientific literature, we know we can get to 50 percent efficiency,”. Clearly, the team is very optimistic about their future, and will be exciting to watch them and see what their next big breakthrough will be.

Will drones be flying for days at a time in the future? Only time will tell, but the future’s looking bright for this field of study.

Dronethusiast Team. Kennedy Martinez

KennedyMartinez

kennedy@dronethusiast.com

Kennedy Martinez is a resident writer who joined Dronethusiast at the beginning of 2019. She has years of experience reviewing drones and other tech products. When it comes to flying drones, Kennedy loves the ability to create artistic videos from a unique point of view. Kennedy enjoys researching new drones and other exciting products that are available to consumers which is why she is committed to creating the best buyer’s guides for our readers.

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Soaring Eagle Imaging Performs 51 Mile BVLOS Utility Inspection in 6 Hours Using Censys Technologies Sentaero v2VTOL

Hurricane Barry made landfall in Louisiana on the afternoon

of July 13th, 2019. Critical infrastructure that keeps the lights on near

Baton Rouge needed an inspection in the aftermath. With 25.5 miles of

500kV power lines as the target, it was imperative to expedite the inspections. Energy companies in the United States are pressured to prepare for hurricanes every year, spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to mitigate risk for what could be a false alarm or a natural disaster. This hurricane season, Soaring Eagle Imaging (SEI) served a major Louisiana energy provider with both parties reaping the benefits of their preparation.

Soaring Eagle Imaging is a professional aviation organization and a partner/customer of Censys Technologies that utilizes unmanned technology for multiple inspection applications to serve a host of enterprise clients. Having over 30,000 manned aviation hours to accompany their 3,000+ UAS hours, SEI brings a strong safety culture to every operation. This is reflected in the 17 emergency Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) waivers they have been granted in the past. Upon completion of operations,

CEO William Paden had this to say: “SEI is now positioned to safely perform BVLOS operations as a ‘normal’ daily mission. The experience gained during training and field missions prove SEI teams are exceptionally proficient in the tasks required to safely conduct these types of operations.”

SEI began conducting BVLOS flights using a Censys Technologies Sentaero

v2VTOL with no remote visual observers once it was determined that safe flights could be conducted. In three missions, the single crew was able to capture 51 miles worth of detailed information in 6 total hours of time in the field including setup, tear-down, and transit. This enabled identification of the scope of damage and corresponding locations, helping facilitate swift repairs. From Mr. Paden: “The level of professionalism from the entire Censys team is the reason our organization is able to continually set new standards in the UAV realm. The constant communication with the leadership and engineering team was instrumental in the aircraft performing to the level it did. Without Censys Technologies, SEI would not have been successful [July 22nd, 2019].”

Currently, there are only 30 commercial entities with approved BVLOS waivers in the United States, making these flights rare. Censys CEO Trevor Perrott remarked on SEI’s BVLOS operation: “I’m ecstatic to see a great partner and customer of ours employ our technology with such an emphasis on safety to deliver exceptional value to energy asset owners. I could not be happier with the partnership we have in SEI, and I’m confident we’ll continue to set standards together. I’m grateful to the FAA for approving the operation without requiring remote visual observers, as yesterday shows BVLOS can be executed safely and economically.”

New partnership provides enhanced UAS beyond visual line of sight training curriculum

SALINA — The Kansas State University Polytechnic CampusApplied Aviation Research Center has partnered with Simlat, an unmanned aircraft systems simulation company, to provide beyond visual line of sight simulator training.

As part of a partnership with the Kansas Department of Transportation, the simulators will initially be used to train partners involved in the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integrated Pilot Program through the Federal Aviation Administration. With a large focus on beyond line of sight operations, participants in the course will receive a comprehensive training experience on both simulation and live flight events.

The UAS Integrated Pilot Program was established to utilize the research and expertise of national partners to shape the future of unmanned aircraft in America. The Kansas Department of Transportation is one of only nine participants competitively selected from hundreds of applicants in the UAS Integrated Pilot Program nationwide.

In 2018, Kansas State Polytechnic was the first university to receive a waiver from the Federal Aviation Administration to administer UAS training beyond line of sight. The purchase of these simulators and partnership with Simlat expands the knowledge base of Kansas State Polytechnic instructors and training offerings, allowing for additional cutting-edge research of drones in U.S. airspace.

“Simlat’s technology allows us to create a highly realistic representation of the operational environment in which we will be conducting our beyond line of sight operations,” said Kurt J. Carraway, UAS executive director of the Applied Aviation Research Center at Kansas State Polytechnic Campus. “The use of the simulator enables our flight instructors to control environmental conditions and inject anomalies into simulated unmanned aircraft systems to provide initial, abnormal and emergency scenarios to ensure our pilots are trained to respond correctly should these instances occur in live flight. Simlat did a great job in working with us to create a very realistic environment for our operations.”

Kansas State Polytechnic’s beyond visual line of sight training program is a seven-day immersive course in which participants receive a series of ground instruction and hands-on flight instruction. The simulator training allows course participants to build flight plans and transition seamlessly from simulation to actual live flight. The flexibility of the Simlat simulators allows instructors to program diverse flight conditions and various flight scenarios such as system failures and environmental and weather conditions.

The educational mission of Kansas State Polytechnic includes real-world, hands-on experiences to ensure students are equipped with the necessary skills to have an immediate impact on industry upon graduation. To further this mission, this beyond visual line of sight simulation training curriculum established by the Applied Aviation Research Center will eventually expand to include Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS degree program offerings.

An Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International award winner and national expert in the UAS industry, Kansas State Polytechnic is known as a top provider of UAS training. The addition of these simulators will provide for the development of another facet of UAS training provided by Kansas State Polytechnic, Carraway said.

A global leader in UAS simulation, Simlat is a leading provider of innovative, next-generation training solutions. These training solution systems enable training for any platform, payload and mission. As part of this established partnership between Simlat and Kansas State Polytechnic, Simlat produced a simulation environment specific to Kansas, allowing for detailed beyond visual line of sight operations within a local environment. This allows for pilots, training participants and students to develop a flight plan with a direct transition from simulator to aircraft.

“We are honored to participate in this important Integrated Pilot Program and look forward to a long-term relationship with Kansas State Polytechnic’s prestigious UAS program,” said Roy Peshin, Simlat’s chief technology officer.

To learn more about research by the Applied Aviation Research Center, contact Carraway at [email protected] or 785-833-2152. To learn more about UAS training offerings, visit ksu-uas.com or call Kansas State Polytechnic’s Professional Education and Outreach Office at 785-826-2633. For more information about Kansas State Polytechnic UAS program offerings, visit polytechnicexperience.com/droneexperts.

Drone-based detection and identification of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) objects

Researchers from Binghamton University’s Geophysical Laboratory and Ukrainian Multirotor Technologies LLC (“Joint Research Team”) completed the first phase of a collaborative research project into the development, testing and field trials of a UAV-based aeromagnetic survey system integrating the UMT Cicada hybrid-powered UAV platform and the Geometrics MFAM Microfabricated Atomic Magnetometer system.

As a result of this collaborative effort, the Joint Research Team developed the integrated Cicada-M aeromagnetic platform, capable of conducting autonomous, long-range, high-accuracy surveys targeting detection and identification of anthropogenic magnetic anomalies associated with Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) objects. High-resolution magnetic surveying capabilities allows the Cicada-M to be used in humanitarian demining efforts, as an element of wide-area technical surveying, consistent with International Mine Action Standards (IMAS) guidelines. Following extensive internal trials and calibration efforts, the Joint Research Team submitted the Cicada-M system for IMAS certification at the Ukrainian Armed Services Demining Center.

Following extensive trials, at the Demining Center, the Cicada-M was approved and certified for deployment as an IMAS 5.1 technical survey platform, capable of producing actionable aeromagnetic survey data outputs consistent with IMAS guidelines 5.1, parts a, b, c, and d, as defined below:

IMAS 5.1. General The outputs from a technical survey include:

a) definition of any area containing mine/ERW contamination;

b) additional information for planning the initial clearance of any area identified as containing mine/ERW contamination;

c) evidence (gathered through all reasonable effort) which may be sufficient to determine and demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the land users, that an area is free of mine/ERW contamination;

d) additional information for the establishment of priorities for future action.

The full Demining Center Report is available upon request from representatives of the Joint Research Team in English and Ukrainian and can be provided in digital form, with an accompanying multimedia presentation.

Some additional information you can find in this PDF file where descirbe reserch tests of “Long-range Hybrid Drone CICADA with using atom magnetometer for detection and identification Unexploded Ordnance (UXO)”.

The Joint Research Team will continue further research and development of innovative UAV-based geophysical solutions and will seek to publicize its results in peer-reviewed scientific journals, technical journals, conference presentation, and in popular media.

Thanks for the active action of all involved person. Especially thanks for support by:

Alex Nikulin, PhD

Assistant Professor of Energy Geophysics Director

Puliaev Andrii, CEO

Ukrainian Multirotor Technologies, LLC

Timothy De Smet, PhD

Director of Geophysics & Remote Sensing Laboratory

Take Drone Racing To The Next Level With The DJI Digital FPV Ecosystem, The First Low Latency HD Video Transmission Signal

New DJI digital transmission system offers integrated control, a dynamic flying experience and long range operation

DJI, the global leader in civilian drones and aerial imaging technology, today launched the DJI Digital First Person Viewing (FPV) Transmission System, an advanced digital ecosystem which includes FPV goggles, an FPV Air Unit Transmission Module, an FPV remote controller and an FPV camera. Together, the system offers smooth, clear HD video, ultra-low end-to-end latency and long-range transmission with strong anti-interference technology packaged into a simplified setup. This breakthrough transmission technology is the next evolutionary step forward in drone racing technology and opens a world of creative possibilities for pilots.

“As drone racing grows in popularity, FPV racers are looking for the next technology to keep up with their demands. The new DJI FPV System was designed using our vast experience creating aerial and ground transmission systems and offers technology truly unique to the market,” said Ferdinand Wolf, Creative Director, DJI Europe. “As the only digital video transmission solution on the market that performs at the same level as analog, even surpassing it in some aspects, we hope to set a new standard for digital FPV.”

Optimal Flight Experience

The DJI FPV Air Unit Module uses DJI HD Low Latency FPV Transmission technology (DJI HDL FPV Transmission) which integrates a two-way data communication mechanism to deliver integrated control over the entire system and a stable, seamless signal connection. DJI HDL FPV offers a low end-to-end latency of 28 milliseconds, similar to high-performance analogue systems. The FPV system has a maximum transmission range of 4km (FCC) or 0.7km (CE)[1] while anti-interference technology brings a reliable feed to the goggles during flight. Additionally, a “Focus Mode” narrows down the signal bitrate to the center of the frame, counteracting any interference so that a clear image is provided even in challenging environments.

The digital signal not only features low latency but clear, 720p footage at 120 fps for an overall enhanced flight experience, ideal for fast paced moments. The FPV system can record on both the FPV camera attached to the drone as well as to the FPV goggles using a micro SD card. Racers can capture video content on the FPV Camera in 1080p at 60 fps or 720p at 120 fps while the FPV Goggles can record 720p at 60 fps which can be instantly played back for quick review.

Fly with your friends as the DJI HDL FPV Transmission System and DJI FPV Air Unit are equipped with eight 5.8GHz frequency channels, allowing up to eight drones to fly simultaneously under one system. Each operator has an exclusive channel, reducing cross-channel interference for the optimal racing experience. Pilots have the ability to view the camera of other racers connected through the “Audience Mode.”

Integrated Control for The Ultimate Racing Experience

The DJI FPV Air Unit, DJI FPV Camera, DJI FPV Goggles and DJI FPV Remote Controller efficiently work together to provide integrated control for the ultimate racing experience. The responsive and customizable FPV remote controller uses a 4-in-1 closed loop software allowing users to adjust parameters for the other three components remotely. Users can change settings on the controller and it will automatically sync the entire system, helping reduce operational error.

Dynamic Flying and Filming Capabilities

The DJI FPV Camera provides three camera modes, racing, standard and LED mode, to allow users to maneuver around obstacles in various scenarios. Racing mode is ideal for most racing situations and delivers images at a higher saturation rate to distinguish brightly-colored objects such as course obstacles. Standard mode is ideal for capturing content by reducing color loss and preserving original details. LED mode enables racers to operate their units easily in low light settings by increasing the color saturation and reducing image noise to help pilots efficiently keep track of their unit’s location.

Beyond racing, the DJI FPV Camera also offers exceptional filming capabilities. A 150° ultra-wide-angle lens creates a dramatic and unique perspective while the 1080p or 720p footage can easily be integrated with video captured by other imaging devices.

As DJI continues to develop equipment and accessories for a more extensive flight experience for drone racing enthusiasts, DJI welcomes collaboration from all drone-related manufacturers with the goal of working together to create an improved ecosystem for drone racing.

Price and Availability

The DJI FPV System can now be pre-ordered and will be available mid-August with two purchase options, the FPV Fly More Combo for £919/€999 and the FPV Experience Combo for £809/€879 . The FPV Fly More Combo includes the FPV Goggles, Air Unit, FPV Camera, Remote controller along with all the wires and antennas needed while the FPV Experience Combo includes the FPV Goggles, 2 FPV Camera and Air Units along with all the necessary wires and antennas. For more information on the DJIFPV System, please visit: https://www.dji.com/fpv

[1]Unobstructed, free of interference, when FCC/CE compliant. Maximum flight range specification is a proxy for radio link strength and resilience. Always fly your drone within visual line of sight unless otherwise permitted.

DJI is a global leader in developing and manufacturing civilian drones and aerial imaging technology for personal and professional use. DJI was founded and is run by people with a passion for remote-controlled helicopters and experts in flight-control technology and camera stabilization. The company is dedicated to making aerial photography and filmmaking equipment and platforms more accessible, reliable and easier to use for creators and innovators around the world. DJI’s global operations currently span across the Americas, Europe and Asia, and its revolutionary products and solutions have been chosen by customers in over 100 countries for applications in filmmaking, construction, emergency response, agriculture, conservation and many other industries.

For more information, visit our:

Website: www.dji.com

DJI’s New FPV System

The DJI FPV Air Unit Module uses DJI HD Low Latency FPV Transmission technology (DJI HDL FPV Transmission) which integrates a two-way data communication mechanism to deliver integrated control over the entire system and a stable, seamless signal connection.

DJI HDL FPV offers a low end-to-end latency of 28 milliseconds, similar to high-performance analogue systems. The FPV system has a maximum transmission range of 4km (FCC) or 0.7km (CE) while anti-interference technology brings a reliable feed to the goggles during flight.

DJI has also developed “Focus Mode”, which narrows down the signal bitrate to the center of the frame. This counteracts any interference so that a clear image is provided even in challenging environments.

The digital signal transmits 720p footage at 120 fps. The FPV system can record on both the FPV camera attached to the drone as well as to the FPV goggles using a micro SD card. Racers can capture video content on the FPV Camera in 1080p at 60 fps or 720p at 120 fps while the FPV Goggles can record 720p at 60 fps which can be instantly played back for quick review.

The DJI HDL FPV Transmission System and DJI FPV Air Unit are equipped with eight 5.8GHz frequency channels, so DJI will be hoping that you and seven friends can get together and race simultaneously under one system. Each operator has an exclusive channel to reduce interference.

Pilots have the ability to view the camera of other racers connected through the Audience Mode.

DJI’s FPV Camera has three modes: Racing, standard and LED mode. Racing mode is for race situations. It delivers images at a higher saturation rate to distinguish brightly-colored objects, such as course obstacles. Standard mode is ideal for capturing content. It reduces color loss and preserves original details. LED mode enables racers to operate their units easily in low light by increasing the color saturation and reducing image noise.

DJI also says the company’s new FPV Camera offers “exceptional filming capabilities.”

A 150° ultra-wide-angle lens creates a dramatic and unique perspective while the 1080p or 720p footage should be of a high enough quality to slide seamlessly in with video footage from other devices.

The DJI FPV System can be pre-ordered today and will be shipped in mid-August.

Did Safety of the NAS Take A Holiday?

You might be thinking that this story is about the six-month deadline the FAA missed for the online aeronautical knowledge and safety test for the cake-eaters formally known as RC hobbyist. Alas no, this story is about more special treatment for the moneyed players. I guess the word on the street is that no one minds the henhouse after the revelation that the DAC industry co-chair’s company’s waiver is bupkis.

Couple that with the waiver window slammed shut, and I guess it is open season to do whatever whenever you want in the NAS. You might have missed the following if you didn’t pony up the $769 to get into the FAA/AUVSI symposium.

This latest example is Skyward Verizon –

§107.31 says, “With vision that is unaided by any device other than corrective lenses, the remote pilot in command, the visual observer (if one is used), AND the person manipulating the flight control of the small unmanned aircraft system MUST BE ABLE TO SEE the unmanned aircraft throughout the entire flight in order to:

(1) Know the unmanned aircraft’s location;

(2) Determine the unmanned aircraft’s attitude, altitude, and direction of flight;

(3) Observe the airspace for other air traffic or hazards; and

(4) Determine that the unmanned aircraft does not endanger the life or property of another. “

Hans is the person manipulating the controls. How can he see the aircraft in

California when he is in a building in Nevada?

This means that they would need a Part 107.31 waiver. But does Skyward or

Verizon have a waiver? The waiver database does not show anything, and a Google search does not show anything either. Furthermore, I didn’t see blocked off streets or a parachute, and there is no Part 107.39 waiver for Skyward or Verizon listed in the FAA database, either.

I am still waiting to hear back from the FAA about the legal applicability of this VO deputizing process in the clip.

Is this good for everyone (regardless of lobbyist affiliation) or just the UAS IPP’s?

The CNN over people flight jackets must be magical.

With all of this waiting, I have to assume everyone is busy with the #737Max workload and enforcing the expanded airspace buffer around airports from 3 miles to 5, and the navigable airspace between the blades of grass.

I casually quipped in June that it was becoming more evident that those playing by the rules were chumps. However, the news lately pretty much makes that a truism.

I said it a couple of articles ago that the cake-eaters (bag-holders, too) and the process are pretty much being mocked. How can public employees utter the “safety of the NAS” with a straight face any longer?

I guess this drone stuff is small potatoes –

https://yro.slashdot.org/story/19/07/27/2054235/nyt-boeing-was-certifying-its-own-safety-for-the-737-max

“Boeing’s 737 Max was built with “effectively neutered” oversight, writes the New York Times, citing interviews with over a dozen current and former employees at America’s Federal Aviation Agency.”

Boeing may have neutered the FAA, but they must have suffered some kind of reoccurring mental block when it comes to drones? The FAA is throwing hundreds of millions of dollars at toys that have yet to kill anywhere near the number this neutering SNAFU has. Starting to look like the Part 107 waiver situation got neutered, too. Creating more regulations they can’t hope to enforce doesn’t sound like a good way to spend your limited time and money unless the ultimate goal is federal job security.

Bottom line, I’m not looking for any preferential or special treatment like the folks with the lobbyists or the #1 Global Brand Happy Good Luck Quadcopter company gets, I’m just looking for some consideration from the FAA for the US citizen hobbyist, small business, and STE(A)M end-users.

VEDA Defense Systems Product Development Engineer – India

New Delhi Area, India

Skills Required:

  • Relevant experience of minimum 2 years in UAV Design and Development.
  • Strong technical skills in the field of aerospace and electronics.
  • Experience transitioning systems from development to production building and flight testing’s UAVs such as quadcopters, octocopters, vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft, and fixed-wing UAVs.
  • Designing flight tests for autonomous flight modes using GPS waypoints.
  • Optimizing flight controller performance and mesh networking.
  • Implementation and/ or development of flight control algorithms.
  • Prior Hands-on experience with Aeromodelling design and simulations.
  • Strong technical knowledge of aerospace systems and manufacturings.
  • Hands-on experience with UAV design and fabrications.
  • Sound knowledge of RF communications systems
  • Ability to think creatively and be innovative particularly when developing designs.

Responsibilities:

Task as a UAV Product Development Engineer can vary depending on your specialist’s area, but you could require to:

  • Apply the principles of science and technology to create Multi-rotor/fixed wings UAVs with a good understanding of the principles involved in their operation and makeup.
  • Research and develop design specifications and use computer-aided (CAD) software to create plans.
  • Take part in the flight test program to measures take-off distance, rate of climb, stall speeds, maneuverability, and loading capacities.
  • Resolve issues that arise during the design, development and testing process.
  • Measures and improve the performance of UAS, components, and sub-systems.
  • Designs and Supervises the construction of air vehicles such as airframes, auxiliaries, communication equipment, controls etc.

Apply here

Liteye and Red Six “Sharpen Their Blade” Against the Iranian Small UAS Threat

Liteye Systems, Inc. is excited and pleased to announce it is teaming with a red team strategic advisory company, Red Six Solutions, LLC. Liteye is the manufacturer, integrator, training, and services provider of the Anti-UAS Defense System (AUDS) currently being utilized by the U.S. Government for countering Unmanned Aerial System threats being used by adversarial militaries and terrorist organizations worldwide. With over $60M in government contracts, Liteye is an industry leader in the counter UAS market. Likewise, Red Six Solutions is a highly regarded red team company specializing in the global analysis of the small UAS threats. Red Six provides its clients “over-the-horizon” insights into the UAS challenges being posed against our military and law enforcement.

Kenneth Allen Geyer, CEO of Liteye System explains, “Liteye is constantly improving our AUDS offerings to ensure they are an effective counter UAS system against relevant threats. Working with Red Six analysts allows Liteye to plan and test against emerging threats, ensuring the safety and mission of our military forces.” Mr. Geyer goes on to say, “the modifications we’ve made to our original prototypes were largely based on red teaming exercises. Red Six provides that look into-the-future that has allowed AUDS to be effective in combat against threats being used by ISIS, Iran and others.”

Red Six Solutions has extensive knowledge and expertise in replicating the capabilities and tactics of UAS threats. According to Dr. Scott Crino, CEO, Red Six Solutions, “Our industry-leading experts travel the globe to learn about the threat and to assess the commercial counter UAS marketplace. Our technicians dive deep into the components being used or expected to emerge on battlefields around the world.” Dr. Crino said, “We can take the state-of-the-art components, build replica threat UAS and test them in relevant environments against Counter UAS systems like AUDS. Sharing this information with teammates like Liteye, gives them a significant advantage in maintaining their edge over the threats.”

Liteye and Red Six will continue to participate in US Government tests and exercises. Liteye will showcase AUDS and other Liteye capabilities this September, in Las Vegas at the InterDrone Conference and Expo 2019. There, Scott Crinowill join Ken Geyer as a subject matter expert to explain the threat posed by UAS to the Warfighter, protected government facilities and critical public and private infrastructure.

About Liteye Systems, Inc. (https://liteye.com)

Liteye is a US company located on the front range of the breath-taking Rocky Mountains. Liteye Systems, Inc. is a world leader in technology solutions manufacturing & integration of Counter Unmanned Aircraft Systems (CUAS), Drone Sense and Warn Systems, rugged high-resolution head mounted displays (HMD), augmented weapons sights, covert thermal surveillance systems, electronic warfare packages, radar systems, and fire control software. Our cutting-edge solutions feature revolutionary designs in optics, electronics, ergonomics, and form factors that enable a broad range of military and commercial applications. Our R&D team delivers sophisticated custom technology solutions for some of the world’s largest companies and government agencies. With offices in the UK and sales affiliates worldwide, Liteye is protecting critical infrastructure from real world threats. For More information contact: [email protected]

About Red Six Solutions (https://red-6.com)

Red Six Solutions is the foremost provider of UAS threat reporting and emulation for the United States government, with particular strength in the fast-growing area of sUAS aircraft and tactics. Red Six has provided flight support for almost every entity in the Department of Defense and the U.S. intelligence community. Red Six pilots have flown against virtually every counter UAS system being used by, or being marketed to, the U.S. government and is currently a leading UAS threat assessment provider to the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Air Force. For more information contact: [email protected]