The Next-Generation Aeryon SkyRanger R80

Since its release in 2013, the SkyRanger R60 has captured real-time aerial intelligence across 30 countries, for well over 100,000 collective hours of operation. The world’s most demanding UAS operators have come to rely on the SkyRanger when lives and livelihoods hang in the balance.

With the new R80, Aeryon is pushing the small UAS performance envelope, with more computing power, more payload capacity, and more advanced software features. Delivering a broader range of mission capabilities, in a wider set of environments, the R80 is redefining what’s possible with a man-packable UAS.

The new SkyRanger R80 is a robust, multi-mission UAS that provides reliable operations in harsh environments and demanding weather conditions. With a wide range of next-generation hardware and software features, the R80 delivers:

  • Group 2-3 payload capabilities in a Group 1 footprint
  • Real-time on-board AI and computer vision for autonomous missions
  • A secure Application Development Kit (ADK) and Payload Development Kit (PDK) to enable rapid 3rd-party software integrations and payload developments
  • A robust IP-54 rated airframe with redundancy in all flight-critical systems

Carry Payloads up to 2 kg

SkyRanger R80 has a payload capacity of up to 2kg, enabling it to carry heavier optics and multi-sensor payloads that were previously restricted to much larger, more expensive fixed-wing UAS. With the new Osprey carry and delivery payload, R80 operators can attach and deliver nearly any object up to 2kg such as radios, ground sensors, medkits, life vests, and more. The R80 adds a new front-mounted EO/IR payload (with image fusion) to supplement bottom-mounted, non-camera payloads.

Flexible and Modular

The R80’s new PDK extends payload development to end users and third-party integrators, enabling the rapid development of mission-specific payloads for the R80 platform. The R80 also offers an ADK to interface with other control applications across a set of secure APIs.

The R80’s power is delivered from four redundant batteries, each rated below 99Wh for easy transportation on commercial aircrafts. With its simple plug-in tether kit, co-developed with Hoverfly Technologies, Inc, the R80 can provide persistent endurance for long-term overwatch or surveillance applications, then can be easily reconfigured quickly back into free-flight mode.

Autonomous and Intelligent

With multiple embedded NVIDIA TX2 processors, the R80 is a flying supercomputer with an engine for real-time artificial intelligence at the network edge, including object detection and classification. To enable autonomous operations or flight in GPS-denied environments, the R80 includes multiple sensors providing flight control inputs, including four dedicated computer vision cameras.

Using Aeryon’s new Multi-Aircraft Control software, a single pilot can fly multiple R80s from a single Ground Control Station (GCS), on a single network, in coordinated semi-autonomous flight plans. Multi-Aircraft Control builds upon Aeryon’s proven Automatic In-Air Replacement (AIR) technology enabling two R80s to automatically replace one another in flight, automatically handing off camera subjects while maintaining continuous eyes on target.

Reliable and Resilient

Building off the proven SkyRanger R60 platform, the R80 offers a rugged carbon fiber and magnesium airframe, tested to IP-54/MIL-810G environmental tolerances. The R80 can withstand sustained winds up to 70 kph, and operate up to 15,000’ MSL under its standard propulsion configuration. Mission success is underpinned by two fully redundant communication links, and two flight computers. For operations in denied RF environments, or beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS), the R80 is able to execute semi-autonomous missions without an active wireless link.

Availability

To meet the unique requirements of the United States Department of Defense and its other federal customers, Aeryon Defense USA (a wholly owned U.S. subsidiary of Aeryon Labs), will customize the commercially available SkyRanger R80, which will be known as the R80D. Delivery of the R80D will begin in May 2018.

https://www.aeryon.com/skyranger/r80/

Drone Software Canada Inc. achieves nation-wide status

Leading drone InsurTech software firm Drone Software Canada Inc. (DSC),

Canada’s leading provider of UAV automation software for the insurance and roofing industries has been awarded a Nation-wide Complex Restricted Standing Special Flight Operations Certificate from Transport Canada.

This advanced Standing SFOC allows DSC to operate Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs or ‘drones’) weighing 25 kg or less in complex environments within built-up areas in Canadian cities and towns as well as within Controlled Airspace, with relatively short notice, subject to the terms and conditions specified by Transport Canada and Nav Canada, the national air traffic control services provider. DSC qualified for this advanced UAV operation certificate by demonstrating to authorities the ability to successfully meet all regulatory requirements.

Kabir Shaal, president of DSC, noted that, “Our advanced SFOC status sets DSC even further apart are being able to actually deliver what we propose instead of just proposing vague services or vaporware like so many others,” adding that, “The best way for us to help our IMGING software customers achieve their own Standing SFOC is by investing the resources necessary to actually do it for ourselves.”

He went on, “DSC went even further by qualifying for Nation-wide status, so that when we tell our clients we will help them get airborne, we really mean it, because we’ve really done it.”

DSC is the exclusive Canadian distributor of patented IMGINGTM UAV automation software developed by their software US principals, Loveland Innovations, LLC especially to meet the needs of p&c carriers,

restoration contractors, and the roofing industry. With advanced features such as automated flight controls, automatic damage detection, sub-centimetre image resolution, precise roof measurements and 3D models, IMGING sets the gold standard for drone automation.

DSC is now conducting flight operations in different regions of Canada, including live flight demonstrations and user training in Ontario and southern Alberta. With clearance from Ottawa to operate nationally, DSC is working with its customers to roll out this new technology rapidly, safely and efficiently.

“The future is here and now”, DSC vice-president Sam Margel said, adding that, “I believe that we are about to witness a quantum leap in insurance-related property inspection productivity and the quality of metrics. DSC’s success in obtaining our Standing Nation-wide SFOC is rooted in our commitment to aviation safety and regulatory compliance”. Margel, who is responsible for regulatory affairs at DSC, added that “Aviation safety and compliance is essential for our continued success and for our customers’ success.”

http://dronesoftwarecanada.com/

Drone News: SkyWall100

This week, a British security technology called SkyWall100 is being deployed to protect the Berlin Air Show from drone threats. Developed and manufactured by OpenWorks Engineering, a UK company, it allows the operator to physically catch a target drone, ensuring security and safety at any event. Check out this video of SkyWall in action!

Drone FAQs: Airspace

The easiest, fastest method for operators of a remote unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to determine the overlying airspace is to utilize one of the many apps available to them. The FAA’s B4UFLY app uses the GPS on your phone to show where you are graphically on a map as well as what airspace is overlying and what restrictions exist at that location. B4UFLY will also list any Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs), national parks, sporting events, restricted spaces, or other special use areas.

Pilots can get automated approval, recently expanded to 500 airports, through the LAANC (Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability) system operated by AirMap, Skyward, and other providers. There are a number of other apps as well, such as Hover (by AirMap) and Kittyhawk. A quick look at a manned aircraft sectional map for your area will also give you a wide view of the entire area and all the various airspaces that will affect your ability to launch.

National parks and sporting events are going to be a no-go, but TFRs are something to always look for prior to launch, as they can pop up anytime, anywhere, depending on the activities in your area. The bottom line is that you need to check the airspace each time you fly.—Sam Cadwell, adjunct faculty in Aviation Sciences at the Community College of BeaverCounty, and a private pilot ground-school instructor.

Drone FAQs: How can I determine what class of airspace I am flying in?

The easiest, fastest method for operators of a remote unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to determine the overlying airspace is to utilize one of the many apps available to them. The FAA’s B4UFLY app uses the GPS on your phone to show where you are graphically on a map as well as what airspace is overlying and what restrictions exist at that location. B4UFLY will also list any Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs), national parks, sporting events, restricted spaces, or other special use areas.

Pilots can get automated approval, recently expanded to 500 airports, through the LAANC (Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability) system operated by AirMap, Skyward, and other providers. There are a number of other apps as well, such as Hover (by AirMap) and Kittyhawk. A quick look at a manned aircraft sectional map for your area will also give you a wide view of the entire area and all the various airspaces that will affect your ability to launch.

National parks and sporting events are going to be a no-go, but TFRs are something to always look for prior to launch, as they can pop up anytime, anywhere, depending on the activities in your area. The bottom line is that you need to check the airspace each time you fly.—Sam Cadwell, adjunct faculty in Aviation Sciences at the Community College of BeaverCounty, and a private pilot ground-school instructor.

Drone FAQs: What are NOTAMs?

The acronym “NOTAM” stands for “Notice to Airmen” and was put into place in April 1947. NOTAMs are informational advisories (not laws) and are filed with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to give pilots and remote pilot operators notice of any potential hazards that could affect the safety of their flight. Some typical uses might be to alert pilots to closed runways, military exercises, airshows, parachute jumps, temporary obstacles, tall obstructions, or drone flights in the area.What are NOTAM advisories, and where can I find them for my area?

The FAA has classified NOTAMs into five categories: Military, which includes all armed forces using the national airspace system; Distance, which has information regarding airport usability; Special Activity Airspace; Pointer, which are NOTAMs that point to other NOTAMs; and Flight Data Center, which are issues that pertain to regulatory items.

Today, as pilots file flight plansand listen to automated flight systems, they check to see if there are any NOTAMs active in their flight areas. In 2015, the FAA posted almost two million NOTAMs. Due to this large volume of data, the FAA has now gone digital and NOTAMs can easily be searched by visiting notams.aim.faa.gov/notam Search. Note: Drone NOTAMs (DROTAMs) have also begun popping up, and can be seen on sites such as the popular skyvector.com, alerting pilots to where they can expect drones. —Cliff Whitney, owner/founder atlantahobby.com and uavexperts.com

Northwest UAV begins manufacturing and parts procurement for their NW-88 Multi-Fuel Twin-Cylinder UAV Engine

With a prototype completion date set for beginning of May 2018, Northwest UAV has completed design work and has begun prototyping their new NW-88 multi-fuel twin-cylinder engine. Using design elements from their internationally deployed NW-44 multi-fuel engine, the NW-88 engine system is set to offer the reliability and efficiency of the NW-44 to a new category of aircraft.

McMinnville, OR: With design work starting just last year, Northwest UAV (NWUAV) has now begun the manufacturing and parts procurement for their new NW-88 multi-fuel twin-cylinder engine (pictured below). Utilizing the same team that developed their internationally recognized NW-44 multi-fuel single-cylinder engine, NWUAV has begun to take the necessary steps to complete a prototype of the NW-88 engine to demonstrate exactly how it will function.

Built specifically for small unmanned aerial systems (UAS) that require extreme endurance, high reliability and advanced payloads, NWUAV’s NW-44 multi-fuel single-cylinder engine continues to see momentous success and continued adoption in small, professional-grade UAVs, filling a much-needed gap in the maturing UAS industry. Borrowing design elements from the NW-44 engine to offer the same endurance, efficiency and reliability for a larger weight class of UAVs, the Northwest UAV team expects the NW-88 multi-fuel twin-cylinder engine to fill another often-overlooked gap in the professional UAV market.

“Early on we recognized that Group II UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles in the 40-75-pound weight class) were attempting to fly 12 hours or more in extreme conditions with the only engines they had available, which were hobby-grade engines designed for the weekend flier,” remarked Chris Harris, President and Owner of NWUAV. “They needed a more reliable, efficient, cost effective engine solution, and that’s how the NW-44 engine was born. Due to their still relatively small size, Group III UAVs (in the 75-150-pound weight class) are experiencing the same endurance and reliability issues in their engine options that the Group II UAVs were facing. With the NW-44 and 1000 flight hours of experience, NWUAV is primed to deliver their next professional-grade engine for Group III UAVs rapidly and successfully.”

With the ground-up design of the NW-44 engine to work from, the manufacturing and parts procurement for the NW-88 twin-cylinder multi-fuel engine for Group III UAVs has already begun! The same team that completed the work on the NW-44 engine has begun manufacturing the cases and programming the quiet mufflers to fit the NW-88 engine prototype. Next, the team will tackle building the first NW-88 puck.

“Now that the NW-44 single-cylinder multi-fuel engine is firmly established as the new industry standard for 40-75-pound UAVs, we can efficiently adapt that design to support 75-150-pound UAVs,” Chris Harris continued. “And like its smaller, older brother, the NW-88 engine is set to be a complete engine system ready to install with minimal or no development costs for the end customer – a plug-n-play engine if you will – making it highly cost effective to adopt on existing platforms or incorporate into new designs.”

A completed prototype of the NW-88 multi-fuel twin-cylinder engine is set to be completed and on display for the first time at AUVSI XPONENTIAL 2018 in the Northwest UAV booth #2219, April 30-May3. Stop by our booth and see the NW-88 system for yourself!

About Northwest UAV

As America’s leader in UAV propulsion system design, development and manufacturing, Northwest UAV (NWUAV) continues to earn its reputation for reliable, cost effective and innovative UAV engines and support systems through meticulous engineering, testing, and manufacturing. Founded in 2005 by President and Owner Chris Harris, NWUAV continues to safely and effectively manage all aspects of product development, from initial concept design through production and beyond to maintenance and overhauls. When reliability is key, count on the team at NWUAV. AS9100-D/ISO9001-2015 certified and DCAA compliant operation.

Find out more about NWUAV:

www.nwuav.com

Sky Power SP-55 TS and SP-210 HF FI TSengines

3W-International’s performance partner, Sky Power GmbH, has introduced its engine and product concept at just the right time before the leading trade fair, Xponential 2018, in Denver. Karl Schudt, managing director of Sky Power GmbH, explains the company’s goals.

You introduced a whole series of new products in April. Can you explain Sky Power’s product and service concept?

Karl Schudt (KS): Sky Power sees itself as a service provider for 3W-International GmbH. We develop technical designs on contract in order to optimize existing 3W-International engines to customers’ wishes. In the process, we generate solutions such as the ECU030 or the high-performance HKZ 215 ignition, which can also be used for other engines from 3W-International. Furthermore, we’re the production service provider for 3W-International GmbH. We’re located in the greater Frankfurt area.

Besides the hardware, you’ve also developed an engine construction kit, which is also being introduced at the fair.

KS: That’s right. The engine kit contains all of the components needed for an engine in order to adapt it to the most varied applications. Thanks the construction-kit principle, we can quickly and graphically illustrate to the customer the components of which his future engine will consist. An adaptation of the engine to the application area can thus be quickly visualized. We’re convinced that an efficient, sustainable engine application can only come through application-specific engine designs. 3W-International’s basic engine always stands at the centre here. We illustrate the overall principle on the new SP-110 FI TS engine.

Can you identify the differences to 3W-Intentional’s basic engine?

KS: The Sky Power engines are all equipped with twin sparks as well as with theECU030 or the high-performance HKZ 215 ignition. Moreover, the SP-110 FI TS possesses a newly developed injection. For these, we need a lot of data to adapt the engine to the environment. This happens via the ECU. Furthermore, we achieve better fuel combustion with the HKZ 2015. All in all, it’s possible to say that we’re achieving a massive reduction in fuel consumption through these measures.

Will further engines follow this development?

KS: Of course. We’re introducing the SP-55 TS and the SP-210 HF FI TS at the Xponential trade fair. The latter will be the first re-engineered Heavy Fuel engine that Sky Power offers. A development pipeline is already available for the post-fair period, and the first customer projects are also scheduled into the development. Furthermore, we’re also continuing to expanding the Wankel-engine portfolio together with 3W-International. So we’re showing a prototype of the 2-disc hybrid Wankel engine SP-480 SRE, which with 70 HP will become the most power engine in the 3W-International/Sky Power product range.

Sky Power GmbH is 3W-International GmbH’s performance partner. 3W-International is the leading manufacturer of 2-stroke internal combustion engines for UASs (unmanned aircraft systems). Sky Power’s function for us resembles that of a contract tuner for a car manufacturer. Customer adaptations, new developments, and the performance enhancement of 3W products are the goal of the partnership. Customer requests and new customer developments are also carried out.

Sky Power GmbH

Hollerstraße 12

D-61350 Bad Homburg

[email protected]

Phone: +49 (0) 6172 – 2654258

www.skypower.online

Drone News: AUVSI Xponential Preview

In this video, the Roswell Flight Test Crew provides a preview of the 2018 AUVSI Xponential show in Denver, Colorado, April 30 to May 3. The big news in the run up to the show has been the announcement of the finalists for the AUVSI Xcellence Awards, making their debut this year. Among the nominees: the Roswell Flight Crew’s own Patrick Sherman, who is up for the Individual Award as a Training and Education Provider, for Airmanship and Contributions to the UAS Industry.